Papa’s Easy Chair

Dear Doll House Lovers,

You know me.  I cannot throw anything away without wondering:  what could this be used for?

So it was that I found myself holding an empty, clear-plastic clamshell case from which we had taken and used dust masks when we painted the kitchen.  The clamshell enticed me to pull out the scissors and glue gun. 

Enter Papa’s easy chair.

I wish I had taken pictures of the process, but it was so spontaneous, I forgot!  Anyway, this is so simple, I think you can easily imagine the process as you see the pictures. 

The first step was to separate the clamshell into two pieces.  I only needed one side from it to make my chair.   I trimmed any edges that felt sharp or that stuck out beyond the simple round, concave piece that I needed.

I cut a rounded piece of quilted fabric from some scraps I had and did a large loop stitch around the outside edge of the fabric, just to help it lay flat and not look so untidy.

The piece of fabric was hot glued into the plastic shell.

Turning the chair over, there was a trough all the way around into which I hot-glued beads.  This gave a pretty trimming to the chair and also gave it sturdiness. 

What to do for legs?  Well, I keep a box of wooden “do-dads” including clothespins, and we have pulled from that many times to make our doll house furniture.  This was easy peasy!  Just attach the clothespins.  And they can be adjusted to let Papa recline or sit up taller!

I hope you enjoyed this most recent creation.  Now that I have a granddaughter here frequently, I am expecting the doll house to get lots of use.  And my daughter, Michaela, the little princess for whom it was all started, she is now 14 and able to pass along her making and playing skills to her little niece.

Don’t forget to play!  And remember to keep things age appropriate and supervised.  Hot glue guns need supervision, and so do small pieces like beads, etc.

Lynn

Glad Greetings Cottage

I wanted to share with you the latest little house that’s going to market.

Isn’t it amazing, and fun, to see what can be made from old boxes and things that would otherwise go in the trash?

The cottage is called Glad-Greetings because of the little girl on the support column and her Glad Greetings.

Made from a cardboard box, this little cottage has wood floors, fabric walls and a beautiful lace “wall paper border.” It comes with handmade furniture.

There’s a fireplace in the corner, with a hearth and a little pot made from Sculpey and wire.

Cork and wire make for good curtain rods, and lace always makes pretty curtains.

The sleigh style bed boasts storage drawers underneath, of course covered in sparkles and with dainty wire-and-bead drawer pulls.

The little window sill is big enough for sitting things on, perfect for a little fairy who lives in the woods and collects things.

A chinese take-out container was cut in half and then covered in fabric to make two beautiful wingback chairs.

The containers were unused and probably would have ended up in the trash were it not for The Scrap Exchange.

I put in a little Kelly doll to illustrate the size of the furnishings.

A clock and little dishes made from Sculpey have started filling in the cupboard, made from a little gift box.

I hope you enjoyed your tour!

Enjoy this day.

Allowing Children To Create

I love the way working with a doll house that’s homemade brings out the creativity in children.

My daughter has made two items lately, totally by herself and not by my urging. First, a crib/playpen. It’s made from a box that contained soap. The legs are tall wooden beads. It is trimmed in ribbon and rick-rack.

And a shower. The shower is pieced together from all sorts of things: a clear plastic box that contained who-knows-what, old ribbon, old lightweight wood left over from an airplane kit, and of course a condiment container. She even used a foam sticker as a no-slip pad in the tub.


Just have fun!

Doll House Bookshelf

Bless their little hearts, my dolls are such book lovers! I knew I needed to find a way to make them a bookshelf for their doll house. When my husband tossed this into the trash can…

my mind raced to the doll house. This is the perfect size — tall and narrow — for making a bookshelf. I retrieved it and put it on my craft desk.

I cut it down to the size I wanted, making the depth and height the perfect size for our dolls and their doll house books. Some of the left-over pieces of the box were used to make shelves which were hot-glued into place.

I then used Mod-Podge to put into place some heavy pieces of scrap book paper, making a sort of veneer on the doll house bookshelf. One large piece, perfectly cut, slid in perfectly behind the shelves, on top of a layer of Mod-Podge, so that made the inside back of the doll house bookshelf.To smooth the edges and give the doll house bookshelf more design I Mod-Podged little pieces of tissue paper around the edges.

I then started putting books in. Ooohh the little dolls had goosebumps when they heard about their new bookshelf!

See anything that appeals to you?


I think we would agree, this is the best corner of the doll house.

A Soapbox For A Doll Bed

The doll will literally get on her soapbox with this project. Well, maybe in the soapbox.

I found the most beautiful boxed soap not long ago at Marshall’s. The soap smelled divine and I just knew the box would be the perfect size for a doll house bed.

I only used the bottom half of the box for this. My daughter decided to use the lid of the box to make her own project. More on that later.

First I cut a strip of fabric to go about one and a half times around the bed (box). I then basted it with a large stitch so that I could gather it a bit. I then carefully glued it around the lower outside of the box to make a dust ruffle. The pink paisley print at the bottom is what was used for this step. After that I took a pretty tieback that was cut from a thrifted curtain, pressed it with the iron and cut it to fit perfectly around the box for a trim to cover the glued portion of the dust ruffle. This trim was hot glued into place as well. Two nice large buttons were glued — one on each end of the box — for decoration.

I then cut a mattress out of some red ticking I had in the scrap box. The mattress is deep and shaped like a real mattress. The top and bottom pieces of fabric were cut to fit perfectly into the box with just enough room for a seam. Then a strip as deep as the box was cut to go all the way around the box to make the “side” of the mattress. It was sewed together first by making a seam in the side strip, then sewing (right sides together) the top to the strip, then (again right sides together) the bottom piece to the side strip, leaving a small opening to turn the mattress and stuff the mattress and then sew it up by hand.


The legs on the bed are long wooden beads, hot glued into place.The last step was to make a sheet and a little downy pillow. Princess of the Universe LOVED it and was inspired to make her own bed. We’ll be posting about that later.

Lynn PS – As always, a reminder to supervise all use of glue guns and craft materials and scissors and sewing machines when working with children.